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Questioning a Question

We are naturally afraid of not knowing the answer. We worry about how that lack of knowledge will be perceived by the other side. We may even begin to question our value.


But what's more valuable?


Someone who does not know the answer, afraid to ask for help, and makes an incorrect assumption that requires damage control. Or someone who is aware of a blind spot, admits they do not know the answer, learns the answer, and acts on a more informed basis.


When questioning, we must be mindful of our delivery. Respect the respondent's time by batching questions rather than disrupting their day several times. Think through potential solutions/answers to questions before asking to better prepare yourself for a productive two-way conversation.


On the flip side, we want our people asking good questions, but we must allow the space for them to feel comfortable. Close the delivery of a message by allowing the listener/learner to follow up should they need. It's as simple as "please reach out if you have any questions." Be genuine when doing so. It may seem inconsequential, but we have to provide this space for some to feel assertive when they don't know the answer.


We're all more valuable when we are able to call on the knowledge of others, and vice versa.


"I LIKE ASKING QUESTIONS TO KEEP LEARNING; PEOPLE WITH BIG EGOS MIGHT NOT WANT TO LOOK UNSURE." - HESTON BLUMENTHAL


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